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The George Herriman Library: Krazy & Ignatz 1916-1918

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For nearly 30 years, George Herriman’s hilarious, poetic masterpiece Krazy Kat graced the Sunday pages of America’s newspapers. Featuring the love triangle of “kat,” “mice,” and “pupp,” each of Herriman’s pages is a work of transcendent art, crackling with verbal wit and graphic brilliance, earning the moniker from many as the best comics strip ever created. This new hardcover collection of all the full-sized Sunday pages from 1916 through 1918 brings back into print the inventive language, haunting vistas, and beguiling brick throwing that makes this strip so special. Perfect for Herriman…read more

Prince Valiant Vol 2: 1939-1940

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Continuing the epic journey of Hal Foster’s most famous creation, Prince Valiant Volume 2: 1939-1940 brings Val into conflict with the Huns and Rome itself. In this second volume, Prince Valiant helps his father reclaim his throne in the kingdom of Thule, fights alongside King Arthur, and is made a knight of the Round Table in recompense for his bravery and wit. Bored by the peace he helped to create, Val decides to independently pull together the forces to battle the Huns’ descent on Southern Europe. When Val’s army breaches…read more

Amazing Mysteries: The Bill Everett Archives, Vol. 1

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After thoroughly enjoying Fire & Water, Bell’s biography of Bill Everett, I eagerly awaited this first collection of early Everett comics. This book collects over 200 pages of this never-before-reprinted work from titles such as Amazing Mystery Funnies (1938), Amazing-Man Comics (1939), Target Comics (1940),Heroic Comics (1940), and Blue Bolt Comics(1940). These titles feature an endless array of great vintage Everett characters such as Amazing-Man, Hydroman, Skyrocket Steele, Sub-Zero, The Chameleon, and many more, all produced by Everett’s shop Funnies, Inc. for such clients as Centaur, Novelty Press, and Eastern Color, and all displaying Everett’s brilliant cartooning and energetic…read more

Captain Easy Vol. 1

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I gave Roy Crane’s Captain Easy, Solder Of Fortune: The Complete Sunday Newspaper Strips Volume 1 1933-1935 a good thumbing many, many times before picking it up. The artwork was too simple, the stories silly. One day in my local comic shop with nothing new to read I picked it up. The first of six volumes contains the earliest Sunday pages from 1933 to 1935. In his first adventure, Captain Easy visits a lost city, battles pirates, dons a deep-sea diving suit to explore a sunken ruin in search of treasure, and…read more

Night Fisher

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R. Kikuo Johnson set the comic world on fire with his 2005 debut Night Fisher.  Unfortunately I wasn’t reading non superhero comics then and never heard of it.  Big mistake. First-rate prep school, S.U.V., and a dream house in the heights: This was the island paradise handed to Loren Foster when he moved to Hawaii with his father six years ago. Now, with the end of high school just around the corner, his best friend, Shane, has grown distant. The rumors say it’s hard drugs, and Loren suspects that Shane has…read more

Like A Sniper Lining Up His Shot

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My local comic shop received this last week although everyone seems to be listing today as its release date. I’ve been waiting all year for Tardi’s Like A Sniper Lining Up His Shot.

Martin Terrier, ice-cold mercenary-turned-contract-killer, has his future all mapped out: He has just executed what he intends to be his final job and is ready to move on to the next phase of his life, which involves discreet retirement accompanied by a long-lost girlfriend. But Terrier’s employers are emphatically not pleased with his decision, old enemies begin to re-emerge, and soon Terrier is forced to once again ply his brutal trade.

The Arctic Marauder

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Fantagraphics keeps the hits rolling throughout 2011 and The Arctic Marauder is the latest in their Jacques Tardi translations line.  Here’s the publisher’s blurb: In our ongoing quest to showcase the wide range of Jacques Tardi’s bibliography, Fantagraphics reaches all the way back to one of his earliest, and most distinctive graphic novels: A satirical, Jules Verne-esque “retro-sci-fi” yarn executed on scratchboard in a stunningly detailed faux-woodcut style perfectly chosen to render the Edwardian-era mechanical marvels on display. Created in 1972, The Arctic Marauder is a downright prescient example of proto-“steampunk” science fiction…read more

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King Of The Flies: Volume 1 Hallorave

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This one caught me by surprise.  As I read more and more collected editions my library of Fantagraphics books grows with new releases and older material “discovered” online and at my local comic shop.  I was perusing their 2011 catalogue when I came across volume 2: it looked interesting but I needed to getKing Of The Flies Volume 1 Hallorave first.  Here’s the publisher’s blurb: Set in a suburb that is both nowhere and everywhere, King of the Flies is a glorious bastard, combining the intricacy and subtlety of the best European…read more

Dust Jackets Must Die

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Originally published at Comic Book Daily under my Jiminy Christmas! column. Why are publishers still producing dust jackets?  The technology has been around for a good century or so to print whatever you want right on the book cover.  In fact the dust jacket was meant as a protection for the book binding of the 19th century and was discarded immediately.  It wasn’t until the early 20th century that fancy designs and artsy materials appeared on the dust jacket to attract potential buyers and has been a selling tool ever…read more

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